Tag Archives: the Bardabee Poet

Author Interview: Eliza Maxwell


Grave Tender cover

 

I had the pleasure several months ago of reading The Grave Tender by Eliza Maxwell, an extremely powerful debut novel. Ms. Maxwell will be joining our Mystery Readers meeting next Saturday in Georgetown, so I asked her if she would mind answering a few questions for me:

 

Eliza Maxwell photo

 

How long have you been writing?

For as long as I can remember, in some form or other.  But if I’m honest, my first true love was reading, not writing.  Reading anything and everything I could get my hands on.  From my Dad’s Louis L’amour and Stephen King paperbacks to my Mom’s dog-eared romance novels, I was hooked from the very beginning.

Writing came about as an experiment, almost.  A little like an alcoholic that decides to try out home brewing.  Because, why not, right?  I was, and still am, looking for just the right concoction.  The one I can’t put down.  Then I share, and hope there may be a few fellow readers out there that like it too.

What was your reaction when you made your first sale?

As a decades long smoker, I finally managed quitting for what I hope was the last time this past summer.  The first two weeks was rough.  I was antsy, irritable, agitated, and I couldn’t keep my hands occupied enough.  I wasn’t fun to be around, to say the least.  At one point I overheard my husband mumbling about a rabies shot for women, but when I called him out, his only response was, “I said your hair looks nice, babe.”  Smart guy.

Making the first sale?  Awesome.  No doubt.  The time between making the first sale and the point when the reviews start to trickle in?  That part felt pretty much the same as nicotine withdrawal.  It’s a wonder my husband still speaks to me.

Where you do get your inspiration?

Inspiration… Hmm.  That’s a tricky one.  To me, drama and story come from secrets.  From mood.  From the dark, deep parts of the heart that we all know are there, but most don’t care to look at too closely.  And somewhere in my head, all of that is intertwined with east Texas and pine trees and riverbanks meant for bare feet.  Trying to separate those, for me, is like trying to unwhisk the eggs from the milk.  It can’t be done.

Whatever takes me to those places is inspiration.  Certain music.  Bluegrass, zydeco.  A spring afternoon in the sun, listening to the birds.  But especially the stories.  You know the ones.  The weird ones that you hear over iced tea on a wraparound porch.  Like the one about the abandoned cabin down the road with iron bars on the windows.  How the old man just couldn’t face the place after that tragedy with his son… Bless his heart.

Those stories, the ones that seem to pepper small towns and quiet places like the seasoning in a good stew, those are the purest form of inspiration for me.  I can’t seem to help dwelling on things that are probably best left alone.

Have you found it difficult to market your work? Any tips for things that worked?

Marketing.  The dreaded, despised mystery of marketing.  All I can speak to is what I’ve tried myself.  Upon launch, I did a blog tour, and connected with some amazing book bloggers.  The tour did little for sales, but I did get a nice boost in reviews.  Some good, some bad, and that was just fine with me.  Expecting everyone to like your book is a bit like expecting the holidays at the in-laws to be drama free.  It ain’t gonna happen.

But the boost in reviews helped to land a Bookbub ad.  And Bookbub knows how to sell some books.

Do you enjoy interacting with fans, or are you an introvert? Do you get much fan mail?

I absolutely love interacting with fans on a personal basis like email, or a book club meeting.  I am, however, a down-to-the-bone introvert.  Social media is an amazing tool that I’ve seen many use masterfully, and though I’ve tried it out, it’ll  never be something I do well.  And that’s a shame.

In spite of that, I really do adore hearing from readers.  There’s nothing that quite compares to it.

What has been your most challenging project to date?

My biggest challenge was, and still is, book number 2.  The first time around, I had no expectations.  Not of myself, and not of the characters.  Number 2 is proving to be my problem child.

What are your other hobbies and interests?

I love anything that involves creating something with my hands.  Within that framework, it’s all fair game.  I paint, I cook, I occasionally build things, and I put more enthusiasm than skill into all sorts of home improvement projects.  I try, sometimes more successfully than others, to keep my family clean and fed.  And in between it all, I read as much as I possibly can.

What does the future hold for you?

My hope is that the future holds all the hours one could need to turn two small children into functioning human-ish creatures, rather than sociopathic cat burglars.  When I’m not setting aside funds for future bail money, my hope is to be able to sink into another character’s secrets and fears as they unfold on the page in front of me.

Not asking too much… I hope.

What advice do you have for new writers…or just those of us not as accomplished as you are? 😉

It feels presumptuous to give advice when I still have so much to learn.  But I don’t mind passing along some words of wisdom from those more successful and talented than myself that I’ve found helpful.

To paraphrase the imitable Chuck Wendig, writers write.  So do it.  I take that to mean, for better or worse, show up and write something.  Anything.  You can always fix it later.

And my favorite piece of advice, from Elmore Leonard: Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip.

Where can readers find you?

I’m on Facebook, and you can follow me on Bookbub for updates on when the next book will be ready to go, but if you really want to reach out, email me at theelizamaxwell@gmail.com.  I’d sincerely love to hear from you.

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Here is the book blurb if you are interested in seeing more:

 

Hadley Dixon was ten years old when her life changed forever.  Since those few tragic weeks, she’s tried to keep the past buried, but old bones have a way of rising up. Grown now, Hadley can’t hide any longer.

 

And if anyone is going to be in or near Georgetown, Texas Saturday March 12th at 2:00 pm, the Mystery Readers will be meeting upstairs at the Library. You are welcome to join us to hear Eliza speak about her book and her career in general. 🙂

Making the Big Sale

Ghosts on Drugs

My first submission of the year has been accepted and paid for. It has been a really unique experience for  me, and I wanted to share it. 🙂

I saw the call for Ghosts on Drugs, and it sounded really fun. The premise is a simple one — each story must include at least one ghost on at least one drug.

I came up with a flash piece about 1400 words long that I really liked and sent it in.

The response was quick, friendly, and positive. And, in a very unique twist for me, the editor, Hy Bender, liked my story, but asked for edits BEFORE acceptance. It was intriguing.

We went back and forth three times before he sent it on to his co-editor, Will Paoletto, to look at.

Then, the waiting…luckily, not TOO long a wait. 😉

To get that email saying “We want it, where do we pay you?” was AMAZING!

I think this was the first time I’ve been paid on acceptance. 15 cents a word. Making this my biggest sale yet.

This is a great start for my goal of $5000 this year!

If you are a writer looking for a great place to submit–I highly recommend Ghosts on Drugs.

Ending and Beginning: The State of the Resolution Address

Those of you who read this blog regularly (Thank you!) have been following my saga of submittals for the past year. Some days, we weren’t any of us sure that I could meet my goal–but I did. Over 400 submissions for 2015. At least one a day. Those submissions ranged from haikus to a novel. Some were submitted multiple times before they found a home–I never said it would be a new submission every day–but most of them did eventually find their niche.

Total Stats:

Month Rejected Accepted Subs
Jan 11 7 33
Feb 9 3 29
Mar 20 23 39
Apr 13 11 32
May 17 15 38
Jun 20 13 31
Jul 16 18 38
Aug 20 19 37
Sep 17 9 30
Oct 13 19 34
Nov 11 16 30
Dec 14 3 32
Total 181 156 403

 

It took some searching to find numbers I had missed posting to the proper columns, but this now works out correctly, with 66 subs still out and not finalized carried over to the 2016 page for follow-ups in the coming week.

I don’t know if you are impressed, but I am…lol.

 

It was exhausting. And, though i saw an uptick in the income page, not particularly profitable. My greatest income by far came from CD royalties and editing.

This year, my husband has provided me with a new goal–$5,000 income. Steep, but I am now of the opinion that if I try hard enough, i can do anything. 🙂

I will be cutting my submission goal to one a week, so I can concentrate on writing more polished pieces of greater length for markets that stretch me as a writer. (I won’t neglect my favorites, but that is the official goal.)

I will consider taking on more freelance work, and doing more paid editing.

Plus, I am in the process of re-releasing my Conn-Mann Chronicles books, and finalizing guidelines for a new Steampunk anthology with Mocha Memoirs.

The year ahead should be exciting, and busy, but not as terrifying as trying to come up with that sub for the day. 😉

Happy Holidays!

It’s Friday, so I am blogging, but it won’t be anything extensive, or witty today. Just a heart-felt wish that your upcoming year is filled with everything you wish for, and that I learn how to schedule posts next year. 😉

It would be awesome to have it post for me on days when it is hard to get to the keys on the correct day. You ever have that problem?

Still the To-Do list is working. Some days I look at all those check boxes and sigh, but they are all done by the end of the day. And I am NEVER that organized. 🙂

If you have an Android phone (apparently, it isn’t available for Apple) I highly recommend the Splend Apps To-Do List. Not saying it couldn’t be improved, but definitely the best one I’ve tried.

Anyway, that’s enough for me to check this off the list today. I hope you have a great day with your family and friends. I plan to.

 

I Find This Fascinating…

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I promised more pictures from Galveston, but this struck me as something I wanted to talk about more. After all, the pictures will still be here next week, or the week after…

So, last Saturday, there was a special showing of Mary Poppins on TV. I recorded it and watched it on Monday.  I was incredibly impressed how well it held up. I sang along with most of the numbers, and rediscovered some that I had totally forgotten about.

It got me thinking about the recent Saving Mr. Banks. I wanted to see the story of the movie getting made. I’d never seen it, and I hadn’t read a lot about P. L. Travers, though I knew a bit about her life. So, I watched this film immediately after Mary Poppins. I was amazed how different the film the fictional version of the author wanted was from the final version.

It made me wonder what the original book was like. I started reading it Monday night. I haven’t gotten terribly far in the novel, but it is substantially different. I also have copies of The Real Life Mary Poppins: The Life and Times of P.L. Travers and Mary Poppins, She Wrote: The Life of P.L. Travers in my queue, because I want to see how accurate the portrayal of Travers was according to her biographers.

Am I obsessing? Is this a trip down the rabbit hole–or maybe up the chimney? 😉

I think it is a good example of how interesting following a research thread can be. 🙂

It’s also an interesting tale of how a writer’s work can wind up totally different than their vision if they are ever lucky enough to get that “Big Hollywood Break.” This is something that every writer needs to be aware of. (Though I’d still love to have to worry about it…)

 

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Promised Pictures from Dickens on the Strand

I said in last week’s post that I would be posting pictures from last weekend’s trip to Dickens on the Strand. We didn’t stay too long at the event, what with bad boots and tired child…but we had fun, and there were some wonderful sights to see!

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We dressed up Saturday morning and headed for the Strand, but needed to stop for some supplies on the way. Like something to carry my things in. That turned out to be a great little basket.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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We split into two different lines to see if it moved any faster. Jamison and Lauren discussing the doll Grace and the parasol…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nurse waiting in line.

Love the detail.

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Beautiful costumes were everywhere.  🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the street performers

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Suffragette City!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20151205_135012[1] Little Lolita

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Absolutely gorgeous.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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My favorite hypnotist!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This skirt is some of the dual color fabric that I just love. I can so see Jo in this material…20151205_130300_001[1]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Bobby and his Sergeant

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A doctor and his nurse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tired child.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Steampunk beauty.20151205_123347[1]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Truly Dickensian family of Beggars

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bobby stand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Punch and Judy show. 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20151205_113450[1]My favorite part of the event!

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Loved this girl’s outfit. I can so see Jo wearing this in green. Practical and pretty!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Adorable child. She didn’t like to have her picture taken, but I caught her when she was distracted. 😉

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Chimney sweeps
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He made Sunny’s vest for

Into the Badlands!

One of the talented members of Airship Isabella — I am a major fan girl.

I had to buy one of his handmade journals…

Their official website is here.

 

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One of the many Penny Farthings to be found.

This was the biggest one, for sure!

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Jo definitely needs one of these cycling costumes!

So much more practical than trying to fly in a fancy dress…

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My friends Glenda Jordan and Annie Walton dressed for fun.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This was the Dickens part of the day. 🙂 Next week, I will show you some of the evening’s entertainment at the Pleasure Pier.  😉

Decompression Time Almost Over

Well, I finished NaNoWriMo despite Jo’s last minute stalling, and I have had a lovely week of doing pretty much the minimum daily list work, which will culminate this weekend in my first visit to Dickens on the Strand, which I have always wanted to go to.  My sister Lauren and I are taking my niece, and dressing up and everything. I am really excited about it.

Have you seen the new Conn-Mann Chronicles website. It will be a one-stop location for all things Conn-Mann. Though it is currently a work-in-progress. Suggestions about what you want to see there are appreciated. 🙂

But I still have my dailies to do first, and blogging here, and Patreon updates, and…isn’t being an adult fun? 😉

Time for the end of the month statistics…through today:

Subs — 375 (after I sub today…and you KNOW I will.)

Rejections — 167

Acceptances — 147

 

Still have some packing to do, so this is short and sweet today. 🙂 Pictures next week.

 

Procrastination Station!

Okay, so we are down to the wire on NaNoWriMo. There are only 5,697 words to go. Jo has behaved herself admirably through most of the draft, and the book has done some things that I really am loving, but…

You knew there was a but coming, right?

BUT, we have gotten to the final exciting climax–and I have no idea what it is going to be. There is no more overt character development to be done in those few pages. The plot has come to a screeching halt before the edge of the cliff, so it can’t be a cliffhanger…

And here I am, procrastinating. I’ve done all my daily chores for the day. I’ve done all my weekly chores for the week (once this is done.) I’ve even done some housecleaning today–and long time readers of this and my occasional blog over at Here’s the Clean know that that means I am really desperate to avoid something.

I have to get going though. It is too close to quit–the end in sight, the word counter filling up, the story compelling me along…

I just need to figure out that last bit. 😉

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Here’s a snippet from the Dime Novel for The Incredibly Irritating Irishman, “Practical Polly and the Village of Doom” — to see more, head on over to The Conn-Mann Chronicles page on Facebook, and don’t forget to Like us. 😉 Website on the way…

Day 25’s excerpt:

Polly held her breath as long as she could, swimming with the current downriver. She was a much stronger swimmer than Jack, so hopefully, she would be far away from where he expected her to be when she finally had to come up for air.

She angled her way toward the far bank as well as possible in the dark. Swimming until her lungs were threatening to burst, she finally broke the surface, gasping for air.

Dawn was breaking, the sky tinged with gold as the mist rose from the warming river. It provided a bit more screen. She would take any cover she could get.

Slogging out of the river on the opposite bank from the village, she put her back to a tree and slid down it to huddle in a miserable heap at its base. What was she to do? Jack had been the center of her world from the moment she met him.

Tears rolled down her cheeks as she realized that most of what she knew of him was probably a lie. Had he even been to the places he claimed? Were the artifacts he had donated to the museums stolen treasures he had no right to? She had given him everything—and he had thrown it all away.

Sobbing, she laid her head on her crossed arms and let all her dreams leave her.

But Polly was practical above all else, and she didn’t let her emotions hold sway for long. Jack would be coming. Probably with his new best friend the chieftain and his warriors in tow. She needed to stop feeling sorry for herself and take stock of the situation.

Swiping the tears from her cheeks, she got to her feet. She could see the smoke of the village cook fires in the distance, so she was still too close for comfort.

Checking her pockets, she found the penknife—she had forgotten that Paolo returned it to her…he probably had too. It was a welcome find. She also had her sling, three rocks—but she could gather more—a ten pound note, and a piece of jerky. She’d save that until she got too hungry to bear it.

She wracked her brains for every bit of survival lore that she could remember. Moss grew on the north side of trees…didn’t it?

Damn Jack! He had her compass in his pack last time she had seen it. And that had been before their capture the first time, so she doubted it was anywhere to be found now.

There hadn’t been anything else of use at the camp, had there? A few bits of canvas and maybe a few feet of rope. Not worth the risk of returning there. He’d probably look there first, sure that she would go back to the familiar.

No, she would strike downriver, staying on the bank opposite the village. He’d never give her credit for that much sense.

Writer Interview: Katie Magnusson

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Today, I have the pleasure of sharing an interview with Katie Magnusson, one of the authors in Mocha Memoirs Press’s new Paranormal Sherlock Holmes anthology, An Improbable Truth.  Here is what she has to say for herself and her story. 🙂

 

How long have you been writing?
I wrote stories for myself all through high school and college, sometimes quick flash fiction, other times whole books, but only in the past two or three years did I start to think that maybe I could actually use all these ideas in my head, that someone else would find them interesting.

 

What was your reaction when you made your first sale?
I think I may have sat in front of the computer for a moment and said, “Holy f***.”

 

Where you do get your inspiration?
Much of it comes from other stories. I see things I like in other characters and wonder what would happen if _________________, fill in the blank… and then sort of go from there. For example, in my short story “Sherlock Holmes and the Hungry Ghost,” I had the premise of a paranormal/horror mystery to work within as part of an anthology. Paranormal mysteries have been done, so often, and often with the same character types, Holmes vs Dracula and such, I wanted to do something a little different. So, the first thing that came to mind was a ghost story. I didn’t want to do vampires or monsters, I wanted something simple and haunting. Haunting, hey, what if Holmes isn’t investigating a haunting, what if he’s the one being haunted? Why would a ghost haunt him? Is a ghost really haunting him? If not, is it in his mind? The story progressed very quickly from “Holmes vs Ghost” to “Holmes vs Inner Demons” with a horror story flare. And honestly, there are few things as terrifying as the things we hide from inside ourselves, as cliché as that sounds.

 

Have you found it difficult to market your work? Any tips for things that worked?
To be perfectly honest, this is the first story I’ve successfully published. It worked though, so I guess the advice I can give would be to keep up on what people are looking for. Don’t discount smaller, independent markets, and ultimately don’t be afraid to just get your stuff out there.

 

Do you enjoy interacting with fans, or are you an introvert? Do you get much fan mail?
If I had fans, I think I would love to interact with them. [So be sure any let Katie know if you read and like her story! — Rie]

 

What has been your most challenging project to date?
I’ve had a series of short stories in the works for years that I’m now trying to polish and publish as a book series. Cyberpunkish Sherlockiana, I suppose would be the way to describe them. Can you tell I like Sherlock Holmes? It’s a challenging project just because it’s the biggest thing I’ve ever done, I’ve been doing it for so long, and it’s going to be hard to finally say, “I’m finished,” instead of “Wait, let me fix that…”

 

Have you always been a fan of Sherlock Holmes?
I got into Sherlock Holmes about six years ago. I tried reading The Hound of the Baskervilles when I was a kid, but I didn’t really like the story. I don’t know if I was just too young to appreciate the descriptions of the gloomy landscape of the moors, or if it was diving into a Sherlock Holmes book that actually features very little Holmes, but whatever the reason, I never really gave the character much thought after that. Much, much later I saw The Complete Sherlock Holmes at a used bookstore, and bought it completely on a whim. Took it home, opened it up, and was instantly hooked. I’m certain that had I started with the short stories as a child instead, I would have liked it a lot more. As it was, I became somewhat obsessed, quickly devouring pastiche and media, everything I could find. Still do, clearly.

 

What was your favorite original story?
“The Adventure of Silver Blaze” immediately comes to mind, for the line about the curious incident with the dog in the nighttime if nothing else (“The dog did nothing in the night-time.” “That’s what was the curious incident.”). Also “The Adventure of the Speckled Band”, “The Adventure of the Copper Beeches”, and “The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist” feature suspenseful plots with women who have a sensible head on their shoulders, and delightfully colorful confrontations between the villains and Holmes. “The Adventure of the Three Garridebs” is amazing for the single moment when Sherlock Holmes finally lets the walls down and we get that glimpse of the great heart along with the great mind… but I could go on like this for ages. You asked for one story, I just listed five. Such is fandom.

 

Did you stick to the canon characters or invent a new companion?
For this story, there isn’t any companion present. As a general rule, I don’t think a new companion should be introduced unless there’s a good reason for it, and I didn’t have a reason. Initially, Watson was going to be a presence, but the more I thought about it, the more I realized that not only did he not belong in this story, but it was essential that he be absent.

 

What are your other hobbies and interests?
I dabble in cosplay, perfumery, puppetry, online and tabletop gaming, painting… working with my hands and escapism, essentially.

 

What does the future hold for you?
Hopefully more writing, and hopefully some of it will be published.

 

What advice do you have for new writers…or just those of us not as accomplished as you are? 😉
One bit of advice for when you’re stuck – write fanfiction. Seriously, it’s a great, entertaining exercise. Write about your favorite show, write about your own characters, it doesn’t matter. It’s good to keep the gears moving, and maybe you’ll uncover an idea you didn’t know you had.

 

Where can readers find you?
Send a tweet to @mrskatem, or look up kaelma on tumblr.

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Six years ago, Katie Magnusson picked up a copy of The Complete Sherlock Holmes on a whim, and promptly devoured it. After picking the pages from her teeth, she sought out other sources of Sherlockiana, and discovered the often delightful world of pastiche. She has a particular taste for cross-genre tales, and is thrilled to be included in a paranormal Holmes anthology.
Katie lives in Wisconsin with an eccentric philosopher husband, and their cherubic Viking-ninja son.

 

Excerpt from “Sherlock Holmes and the Hungry Ghost” by Katie Magnusson:

 
The next few days were mundane. Holmes occupied himself with a chemical synthesis, finished updating his scrapbook, played concertos by Tchaikovsky, Mendelssohn and Paganini, and read every news publication in London. Twice.

 
His mind raced, an overworked engine threatening to break itself apart at any moment. He hadn’t eaten all day. He couldn’t. He was exhausted, but he couldn’t sleep. He had to do something. Anything. Everything. By God, what he wouldn’t give for a puzzle to walk through the door, for some crime to be committed! A horrible murder, a theft, blackmail, an encoded message, just give him work!

 
In a fit of exasperation, he pulled open his desk drawer. The case and bottle lay there, where he’d shut them away, out of sight. His hand trembled as he reached for the bottle, stopping just as his fingers brushed the surface. He took a breath and closed the drawer. The only way to know the damage done to his mind was to resist. He had to provide a consistent, controlled environment to assess his faculties, and so he would suffer through the boredom of existence.

 
Holmes tossed some pillows onto the floor, sitting down with his legs tucked up underneath him. He relit his pipe and closed his eyes, hoping he could manage to calm his mind at least for a moment. Just one moment’s reprieve was all he wanted…

 
He opened his eyes, lying on the floor. He’d fallen asleep. His body had finally rebelled and forced upon him the rest he sorely needed, much to his amused chagrin. He stood slowly, stretching his long limbs, and beheld his correspondence scattered across the room.

 

The jackknife that usually held it in place on the mantel was gone.
He turned, scanning the room. The knife was easy to spot, embedded in the opposite wall from the fireplace. He didn’t remember throwing it there.

 
“You’re going mad.”

 
“Who’s there?” He looked around and saw no one. He was alone.

 
“They’ll leave you–”

 
“Where are you?”

 
“–just like everyone else.”

 
It was a woman’s voice, and it seemed to come from everywhere at once. She laughed as he searched, and a tingling feeling crept across his skin as if an insect were crawling down his spine.

 
His head felt as if his skull was being hollowed out with a red hot poker. His chest was tight. He couldn’t breathe. “Voices that aren’t there…” he wondered aloud. Could the damage to his mind be so great?

 
“No. I refuse to believe it,” he pressed his hands to his ears as the woman laughed again, taunting, though it did nothing to dull the sound. “I am sane! If I were not, then I would not recognize my decline! These experiences have nothing to do with the cocaine,” he stalked over to the knife in the wall, yanking it out and firmly sticking it back in its proper place in the mantel, “I refuse to believe it,” he said again, softer, slowly absorbing the significance of his statement. “If I am not mad, then what is going on?”

 
You can also find An Improbable Truth in these locations:

Mocha Memoirs Store
Paperback on Amazon
Barnes and Noble
Smashwords

Writing is Exciting — 3 D’s for Daily Success!

It’s another week down on NaNoWriMo. So far, things are going along swimmingly. Jo is proving to be her usual feisty self, and things are heating up for Practical Polly in the dime novel too.

There is nothing more exciting than work that is going well.

Several things help make writing go well.

1) Discipline — writing at least a little every day instills a pattern, and having a pattern is one of the ways that it becomes ritual. Once something is ritual, it is much easier to keep it going on a schedule. 🙂

2) Determination — one of the things that helps make sure that the discipline leads to ritual is determination. Determination to keep going even when the days are hard and the Muse is taking an extended coffee break.

3) Divergence — now, some may disagree with this last one, but I have found it to be truly helpful. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. If things aren’t going smoothly in one area, switch to another genre–or format. Switch from fantasy to historical. Switch from poetry to short story. Perhaps just take an hour or two and research rather write (as long as you go back to the writing part before the day is out.)

So, there you have it. Three tips to potential success. Go and write!